How To Fix "Managed By Your Organization" In Windows 10

9:31 PM

managed by your organization, fix managed by your organization, how to fix, some settings are hidden or managed, 365 personal, microsoft account, windows 10, office 365, 365 business

"Some settings are hidden or managed by your organization."

This error message in Windows 10 Settings can be one of your worst nightmares on a Windows 10 machine. With this restriction in place, you may not be able to use Windows Hello, Location History, or several other Windows 10 features that are tied to logging in with an Office 365 account. You may even be forced to use a local account instead just so you can do administrative tasks like uninstall or install programs. 

Don't panic, though. While this can be a stubborn issue to get rid of, there is a final solution to it all if all else fails. I'm about to suggest a series of troubleshooting steps that you will not find anywhere else. So keep reading!


Basics First: Simple Fixes

There are some steps you need to do first before we come to the big fix for "some settings are hidden or managed by your organization" in Windows 10. This is because the big solution is dramatic and will take time (up to a month), while these other fixes only will take a minute or two of your time. Please follow the provided link and go through all the steps. If you find one you cannot do, it is okay to skip over it. 

How To Fix "Managed By Your Organization" 

In my case, I was getting this error because my Office 365 Personal account was "kidnapped" by an Office 365 Trial that was canceled. The admin account no longer existed, yet it was still tied to my 365 Personal accounts as the administrator. Of course, Microsoft tech support was no help (and I will be writing a story on that later). 

If you're in a similar situation over a Business 365 trial or Teams trial, this is likely going to be the only fix for your issue. You will need to completely reset your account. This is how you do that:

  • Cancel your Office 365 Personal account. Let it run out of service and become deactivated. 
  • Go to Settings > Accounts > Sync Your Settings. Change "Other Windows Settings" under "Sync Settings" to "off." 
managed by your organization, fix managed by your organization, how to fix, some settings are hidden or managed, 365 personal, microsoft account, windows 10, office 365, 365 business
  • Go to Settings > Accounts. Click on "Sign on with a local account instead." Follow the directions to disconnect Windows 10 from the Microsoft 365 service and set up an old-school local account (like in Windows 7, Vista, XP, etc.). 
managed by your organization, fix managed by your organization, how to fix, some settings are hidden or managed, 365 personal, microsoft account, windows 10, office 365, 365 business
  • Reactivate your Office 365 Personal account's billing. 
  • Make an online or offline backup of all your files to prepare for a reinstall of Windows 10. 
  • Go to Settings > Update & Security > Recovery > Reset This Pc. Click "Get Started" and run through the wizard to start over with a fresh copy of Windows 10. It will ask you if you want to install from your local copy of Windows 10 or download the latest copy from the internet and install that. I recommend starting with the latest edition to eliminate any possibilities of upgrade bugs, but ultimately the choice is up to you. Using the local copy of Windows 10 to reinstall shouldn't cause any issues, but if it does... start fresh with the latest download. 
managed by your organization, fix managed by your organization, how to fix, some settings are hidden or managed, 365 personal, microsoft account, windows 10, office 365, 365 business

  • This time, sign in to your Microsoft 365 account as part of the Windows 10 setup like you would normally. When you finish, you shouldn't be getting the "managed by your organization" error anymore. If you DO still get it...
  • ... Reboot your computer and start pressing the F2 key repeatedly as soon as it restarts, before the computer company's boot screen shows on your display. This should take you into the BIOS. Find the Secure Boot settings in the BIOS menus (it will likely be under a menu named "Security"). Select the option to reset Secure Boot to factory settings, then press F10 to save your changes and reboot. Now you shouldn't see the error message anymore in Settings
  • You can now return to Settings > Accounts > Sync Your Settings and change "Other Windows Settings" back to "on."


What Did I Just Do To Fix This?

I just walked you through resetting your Microsoft account and your local installation of Windows 10. I suspect this error is so stubborn because of how Windows 10 is designed to link your online account with your local machine: they are designed to be interdependent on each other, so if the settings aren't right with one, it won't be right with the other, either. This makes it harder for an attacker to spoof your machine or Microsoft, but it also makes it a lot harder to fix problems with user access to administrative features. You pretty much have to reset both your Microsoft account and your local machine simultaneously. 


How Did This Happen In The First Place?

Microsoft is currently trying to tie Azure and Active Directory services (intended for corporate business clients) to their 365 infrastructure, making the two interoperable and dependent upon each other. The problem with this is that small businesses and home users don't need their accounts tied to the corporate tools provided by Azure and don't know how to use them. Microsoft does not warn them about this or explain it, either. In fact, the option to keep your 365 Personal accounts the same or convert it over to the Azure infrastructure is worded as an option between having one 365 accounts and more than one for employees. There's no mention of Azure or Active Directory, and there's no mention that you need Azure admin skills to use them. And since Azure likes to use its own language for everything and reinvent the wheel, there's not much chance any techies are going to be able to pick it up and figure it out, either - not without some instruction, which is exactly what Microsoft wants. 


What Do I Do Now?

Well, that's up to you. If you're ready to say goodbye to Microsoft, there's a great variety of Linux distros that are easy to use and just as competent as any Windows desktop. However, there is limited third-party software support in Linux, so you may have some apps you need to use, which will require Windows. You still have options. You can try running Windows in a virtual machine under Linux (which runs the OS in a window on the desktop), using a Windows emulator like Wine or Crossover Office, or you can install Linux to your hard drive alongside Windows. 

Unfortunately, since Microsoft has turned the desktop operating system into a monopoly, there's not a whole lot anyone can do to get away from Windows if it is needed for work or school. If you really want to see some changes in that, though, you can start by emailing companies who make software you'd like to see available on Linux. If these companies see enough customer interest in a Linux version of their software, they will start trying to implement it. 

It's time that consumers stopped being compliant with paying for subpar software, support, and services. The only way companies like Microsoft will change to care more about the customer experience is if you, the customer, show them that you are willing to take your business elsewhere if they are slacking off on you. Take a stand for yourself, and you will see tech companies like Microsoft follow suit. 





You Might Also Like

0 comments